A
 
Web www.artsmart.co.za
A R T S M A R T
arts news from kwazulu-natal

music
www.artsmart.co.za
enquiries@artsmart.co.za
 A current news
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
letters to the editor
home page
archives A
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
 

NB: as of 23 September 2008, all new artSMart articles are being published on the site news.artsmart.co.za.

KZNPO NATIONAL YOUTH CONCERTO FESTIVAL (article first published : 2000-10-24)

Last Thursday’s concert in the Durban City Hall proved one of the highlights of the KZN Philharmonic’s current Spring Season. Entitled Tomorrow’s Stars, this was the orchestra’s annual showcase for young South African musicians approaching, or on the cusp of, professional careers.

The extraordinary level of proficiency heard onstage belied the shocking neglect of music in most South African schools, a situation which will impact more on tomorrow’s audiences and on our society at large than on the aspirant stars who will always rise and shine – elsewhere, sadly.

But back to the moment in hand. It was heartening to hear seven young soloists, who’d passed through the process of national auditions, make the most of David Tidboald’s and the KZNPO’s superb support to give their considerable best before a large and overtly enthusiastic audience.

The first half of the programme introduced the clear-voiced Gauteng-based soprano Erica Eloff in a limpid, communicative account of Mozart’s Exultate Jubilate. Durban’s Sharadha Haribai (15) met the stylistic challenges of Haydn’s D major Piano Concerto’s second and third movements with assurance. She captured much of the wit and exuberance of the finale’s Hungarian dance elements, although some of the scale passages could have been more articulated.

Stefan Grové’s elegant line and vibrant timbre in the second movement of Dvorak’s Cello Concerto were beautifully framed by clarinettist Karen Keay and the KZNPO winds’ delivery of the lovely opening melody. Grové showed himself up to the technical and emotional challenges of the passionate third movement, aside from some unfocussed tonal projection.

Cape Town-based Marc Uys, a former pupil of Isaac Melamed, KZNPO’s deputy concert master, endorsed his fast-growing reputation as one of this country’s finest young violinists. His interpretation of Chausson’s Poème was one of the highpoints of the evening, along with Ilse Minnie’s musical performance of two movements from Ney Rosauro’s Marimba Concerto and Philip Avierinos’s blazing account of the first movement of Khachaturian’s Piano Concerto.

This was not a competition but the evening was crowned by a glorious performance from soprano Joyce Moholoagae. Her hauntingly lovely account of the great lament, My Man’s Gone Now, from George Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess drew a storm of applause that would have happened in any auditorium on the globe.

This is a major voice destined by rights, and with the nurturing it deserves, for the world circuit. Watch Moholoagae go places. With a God-given instrument such as hers and the courage and tenacity to keep working at it, she could spearhead KZN and South Africa back into the grand tradition of one of music’s most durable, rewarding and highest art forms, Opera.

The rewards for us all would be immense. - William Charlton-Perkins




 A current news
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
letters to the editor
home page
archives A
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
a co-production by caroline smart services and .durbanet. site credits
copyright © subsists in this page. all rights reserved. [ edit ] copyright details  artsmart