A
 
Web www.artsmart.co.za
A R T S M A R T
arts news from kwazulu-natal

music
www.artsmart.co.za
enquiries@artsmart.co.za
 A current news
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
letters to the editor
home page
archives A
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
 

NB: as of 23 September 2008, all new artSMart articles are being published on the site news.artsmart.co.za.

KZNPO CONCERT: 1 NOVEMBER 2007 (article first published : 2007-11-2)

Wet and windy conditions obviously deterred some people from going to the Durban City Hall for this concert by the KZN Philharmonic, but those who braved the weather were rewarded with a programme of strong quality and interest.

Two noble works by Elgar, the Nimrod item from the Enigma Variations and the Symphony No. 1 in A flat major, opened and closed the proceedings, the orchestra playing eloquently under the direction of Lykele Temmingh. But the high point of the evening was without question Philippe Quint’s performance of Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto in D major.

This concerto is brilliant and popular. It was written 130 years ago, and the influential and sometimes venomous Vienna critic Eduard Hanslick (who spent a long time denigrating Wagner) wrote that it was “music that stinks to the ear”. Today the concerto holds its honoured place in the repertory and Hanslick is a footnote in musical history.

The work is technically difficult and it does require an accomplished interpreter. Philippe Quint certainly falls into that category. Born in Russia, he has lived in the United States for the past 15 years. I would guess that he is in his early thirties. He is tall and slender, with thick black hair, and dressed entirely in black as he was for this concert he looked like some latter-day Paganini.

He played like one too, handling rapid figurations and the long first movement cadenza with calm aplomb. But it was in the lyrical passages that I found him most impressive. This concerto owes its eminence to its wonderful stream of melody, and Philippe Quint extracted a most beautiful tone from his 1723 Stradivarius, especially in the lower register.

As a player he has that elusive magnetism called star quality, and the City Hall audience acknowledged it with protracted applause (even breaking into an enthusiastic round of clapping at the end of the first movement).

The violinist responded with a spectacular encore, appropriately enough by Paganini. - Michael Green




 A current news
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
letters to the editor
home page
archives A
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
a co-production by caroline smart services and .durbanet. site credits
copyright © subsists in this page. all rights reserved. [ edit ] copyright details  artsmart