A
 
Web www.artsmart.co.za
A R T S M A R T
arts news from kwazulu-natal

music
www.artsmart.co.za
enquiries@artsmart.co.za
 A current news
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
letters to the editor
home page
archives A
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
 

NB: as of 23 September 2008, all new artSMart articles are being published on the site news.artsmart.co.za.

FRIENDS OF MUSIC RECITAL: FEBRUARY 15 (article first published : 2005-02-16)

Sarah Oates is slight of figure and demure of mien, but with a violin in her hands she packs a powerful punch, as an admiring audience soon discovered at her Friends of Music recital in the Durban Jewish Centre.

In the company of another imposing performer, the pianist Elna van der Merwe, she played a lengthy and taxing recital programme ranging from Beethoven to the contemporary Estonian composer Arvo Part and displayed an unflagging, big, bold technique throughout.

Ms Oates, who is 28 years old, was born in Johannesburg and has already carved out a distinguished career as a soloist, chamber player and principal violinist with The Hague Philharmonic in Holland. Elna van der Merwe has won numerous piano and organ prizes in South Africa.

The balance between these two expert players was excellent, especially in the opening item, Beethoven’s Sonata In G major, Op. 30 No. 3. In his 10 sonatas for violin and piano Beethoven gave equal prominence to both instruments, and the interplay in this delightful Op.30 no.3 was outstanding, notably in the lengthy and eloquent second movement. The final Allegro was taken at an almost uncomfortably fast tempo, but the players brought it off with panache.

The Fratres (meaning Brothers) by the Estonian composer Arvo Part was written in 1977 for string quintet and wind quintet, and the violin and piano version was written in 1992. It is basically a theme and variations. It opens with brilliant arpeggios for the solo violin and later develops into fascinating bell-like structures. This is new music that is assimilable and enjoyable, and it was given a totally convincing interpretation by the two performers.

Ernest Bloch’s Baal Shem: Three Pictures of Chassidic Life, based on Jewish traditional music, brought forth more strong and vivid playing, especially from the violinist.

Brahms’s melodious Sonata No 2 in A major Op. 100 and four well-known pieces by Fritz Kreisler gave the artists more opportunities to display their varied talents.

The “prelude performer”, funded by the National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund, was 12-year-old Benjamin van Aswegen, a pupil at Kearsney College. He showed a voice of great sweetness and agility, in songs by Schubert, Faure and Lionel Monckton. - Michael Green




 A current news
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
letters to the editor
home page
archives A
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
a co-production by caroline smart services and .durbanet. site credits
copyright © subsists in this page. all rights reserved. [ edit ] copyright details  artsmart