A
 
Web www.artsmart.co.za
A R T S M A R T
arts news from kwazulu-natal

music
www.artsmart.co.za
enquiries@artsmart.co.za
 A current news
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
letters to the editor
home page
archives A
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
 

NB: as of 23 September 2008, all new artSMart articles are being published on the site news.artsmart.co.za.

KZNPO CONCERT: JUNE 17 (article first published : 2004-06-18)

The soloist in last nightís concert presented by the KZN Philharmonid Orchestra was Nikolaus Lahusen from Bremen, Germany. He played Chopinís Piano Concerto in F minor and turned out to be a somewhat enigmatic figure. He is a tall, loose-limbed, almost languid-looking man aged about 40, I would guess, with a cast of face that often seems to give him a slight smile; a not unwelcome sight, and a pleasant contrast to the gnashing of teeth school of piano-playing.

Likewise, I found his playing of Chopin a refreshing change from the lugubrious approach of some pianists. Chopin may have died of tuberculosis at the age of 39 but his music is more often than not vigorous, passionate, robust and energetic.

That seemed to be Nikolaus Lahusenís standpoint. He took a firm grasp of Chopinís piano score and delivered the music emphatically, especially the concertoís two outer movements. It was not absolutely note-perfect but it was convincing. And the Larghetto, one of the most beautiful things Chopin ever wrote, produced some beautiful cantabile playing.

Not everybody sitting near me in the City Hall liked his performance. I did.

After the grace and esprit of Chopin came the lengthy introspections of Brahms in his Symphony No. 3 in F major. The conductor, Bernhard Gueller, also originally from Germany, unfolded with high skill the drama and subtleties of Brahmsís music. The orchestraís balance was excellent, especially in the poignant third movement, with some outstanding playing from the woodwind and the brass.

Weberís well-known Euryanthe Overture opened the concert, which was dedicated to the memory of Bruce Hosking, a man who made a major contribution to the professional music scene in Durban through his dedicated financial leadership. The orchestraís chief executive, Bongani Tembe, gave some of the background in a brief but eloquent address from the platform.

Final note: the programme picture that was supposed to be Chopin was something far removed from the delicate features of the Polish composer. What we were given was an individual with an imposing handlebar moustache, a kind of cross between the young Edward Elgar and the mature Jimmy Edwards of broadcasting fame. The face seemed vaguely familiar. I couldnít place it, but it was certainly not Chopin. - Michael Green




 A current news
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
letters to the editor
home page
archives A
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
a co-production by caroline smart services and .durbanet. site credits
copyright © subsists in this page. all rights reserved. [ edit ] copyright details  artsmart