A
 
Web www.artsmart.co.za
A R T S M A R T
arts news from kwazulu-natal

miscellaneous news
www.artsmart.co.za
enquiries@artsmart.co.za
 A current news
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
letters to the editor
home page
archives A
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
 

NB: as of 23 September 2008, all new artSMart articles are being published on the site news.artsmart.co.za.

HEALING POWER OF NATURE (article first published : 2005-09-20)

On September 25 at 18h00, SABC3 will screen The Healing Power of Nature: Perfect? which focuses on the exceptional story of a streetkid who saved his life through surfing.

Produced by Mafisa Media in collaboration with the World Conservation Union (IUCN), the film includes the services of Edmund Mhlongo of the KwaMashu Community Arts Project as co-assistant director with Michael Raimondo of the IUCN.

Samuel Mabetshe was once a street kid from a shantytown called Tokyo Sewale, a grim place in Jeffrey’s Bay not far from Port Elizabeth. At the age of eight, Sam was forced by his father’s fondness for booze and violence to leave home. He lived like an urchin, smoking dope, stealing from tourists and picking rotten food out of rubbish bins. Today many of these young men are either dead or in jail.

What is it that saved Samuel from their fate? The answer lies in the ocean, not far from the shantytown, where a coincidental combination of land, sea and wind has created one of the world’s most perfect waves.

The conversion from street kid to surfer began when Samuel chanced upon a surfing school run by Brenton Williams in Jeffrey’s Bay. Sam offered to do a bit of menial work in exchange for some food – and it wasn’t long before he became hooked. Brenton and a couple of other local surfers spent months taking him out into the water, teaching him to swim and ride the smaller waves.

Today, Samuel is an elegant exponent of the legendary “Supertube”, a barrelling roller that breaks against the shore not far from his shattered home. And, although he doesn’t know it, Samuel has become an example of “biophilia”, the uncanny ability of nature to balm the wounds that people inflict upon each other.

“You find more love in the ocean than what you find on land,” he says. “On land there is always someone fighting with the other person. In the location people nearly die every weekend.”




 A current news
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
letters to the editor
home page
archives A
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
a co-production by caroline smart services and .durbanet. site credits
copyright © subsists in this page. all rights reserved. [ edit ] copyright details  artsmart