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LUTHULI MUSEUM CELEBRATES (article first published : 2005-08-16)

The Luthuli Museum, a declared national institution which oversees the preservation of the life, history and philosophies of Africa’s first Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, Chief Albert Luthuli, (1898–1967) celebrates one year on August 21.

The museum located in Groutville at Kwa-Dukuza (formerly known as Stanger) was officially opened by President Thabo Mbeki on August 21 as part of the Cabinet-approved National Legacy Project which aims to acknowledge contributions of unrecognised and under-recognised anti-apartheid heroes.

The largest of its kind, this launch attracted over 15,000 people (including children) who gathered in Stanger to honour a man who, in 1958, urged South Africans to set an example for the world, predicting that South Africa with all its diversities of race and colour would show the world a new democracy.

Chief Luthuli’s life was characterised by an indefatigable commitment to the ideals of democracy, non-violent resistance, freedom and unstinting faith in the potential of Africa to make a vital contribution to the world. Chief Luthuli became Africa’s first Nobel Prize Peace Laureate in 1961 and in 1962 he published his autobiography, Let My People Go, which was banned. On July 30, 1967, a crowd of 7,000 gathered at the Groutville Congregational Church to pay final tribute to him. On the other side of the world, millions of people, presidents of the free world and ordinary people mourned Chief Luthuli.

Amongst the line-up for the first year celebrations is a fresh photographic exhibition on the life of this remarkable man, a launch of the interactive centre and a community internet café and a series of education programmes for children and adults.

The Luthuli Museum is also physically accessible by wheelchair and aims to make its programmes and activities accessible from a seated position. Free and secure parking bays are available on a first-come-first-serve basis.

For more information regarding the event and a free copy of the programme, contact Reginald Letsatsi at 032 559 6822/3 during office hours or via luthulimuseum@webmail.co.za.




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