A
 
Web www.artsmart.co.za
A R T S M A R T
arts news from kwazulu-natal

film and television
www.artsmart.co.za
enquiries@artsmart.co.za
 A current news
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
letters to the editor
home page
archives A
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
 

NB: as of 23 September 2008, all new artSMart articles are being published on the site news.artsmart.co.za.

MULTICHOICE VUKA! AWARD WORKSHOPS (article first published : 2007-09-9)

Every year the MultiChoice VUKA! Award workshops travel across South Africa seeking to inspire, encourage and empower aspirant filmmakers. The VUKA! workshops are run by top industry professionals and offer rare insight into different aspects of the film, television and advertising world. This year, those who offered their services were line producer Candice Tennant; art director Judith Mofutsanyana; cinematographer Rob Wilson and Y&R creative director Clinton Bridgeford.

The inspired VUKA! campaign – now in its ninth year - harnesses the generosity and creative energies of the SA film industry to give a face to real life problems. The winners have their public service announcements (PSAs) showcased on DStv to over one million homes in South Africa and surrounding countries in the following year.

Since the start of the awards, filmmakers have embraced the concept of giving back to charities and NGOs who rely on public exposure for fundraising and support. While MultiChoice has donated more than R70 million rand of airtime to screen the VUKA! ads on its DStv channels, the film and advertising industry has also come to the party by putting in about R30 million in facilities and personal expertise.

The MultiChoice VUKA! Award workshops are open to anyone; the only prerequisite is an interest in filmmaking.

Art director for McCann Erickson Judith Mofutsanyana has been a judge as well as having worked on a commercial for Powa (People Opposing Women Abuse). “It’s amazing how much you can learn if you are interested,” says says. “The MultiChoice VUKA! Workshops are a fantastic resource for anyone with a passion for filmmaking.

“While I was judging last year I was concerned by the lack of vernacular entries,” she adds, “I was told that these workshops would be a platform for me to do something about the lack of entries in all South African languages. This year I was delighted to accept an invitation to take part in these workshops and I focused on communication in the relevant language for the relevant target market and not just communicating in English because we think that is what the judges want and understand. In the advertising world there is a huge demand for people who can conceive ideas in the vernacular. I was amazed to see just how much work is put into these workshops and the important role they play in the industry. It was hugely rewarding being part of a team involved in something so positive.”

Just how significant does Mofutsanyana believe the VUKA’s are for the South African film industry? “They are a brilliant vehicle for people to get involved both in this dynamic industry while also being able to show their abilities. They also offer a wealth of information on how it is possible for anyone with interest to take part. VULKA’s are a forum for anyone, from any walk of life and using any language to express themselves, show their raw talent and have the industry as their captive audience.”

Line producer Candice Tennant says that she was inspired by the enthusiasm that came from this year’s students: “If this is the future of the South African film industry then it is looking very bright indeed.”

The students spent a full day with the professional filmmakers, listening to lectures in the morning and brainstorming ideas around briefs in the afternoon. Tennant encouraged students to create a PSA about something they were really passionate about: “Making a PSA is hard, but the more you believe in something the easier it becomes.”

Y & R Cape Town’s creative director Clinton Bridgeford was on hand to assist the Cape Town learners with creating a concept. He spoke about the seven creative principles involved in generating ideas, the most important of which: “The Idea is god.” Bridgeford found the workshops a positive experience and was encouraged by the students’ interest and attentiveness. He felt that it was important that the Workshops offered advice across all aspects of the industry from production to direction to conceptualisation.

Cinematographer Rob Wilson was impressed with the students’ concepts and visual literacy, and also the confident way in which they pitched their ideas. His main focus was to guard the newcomers from “making an idiot of themselves”. Rob’s top tips were: Do your homework. Shoot the narrative of the film on a stills camera, before using a moving picture camera. Treat all the equipment with respect and don’t make the suppliers regret giving equipment to students. Always have a qualified professional present when working with lighting and camera equipment. Finally make it personal and make it count.

If you missed out on this year’s workshops you can download the workshop workbook from http://vuka.multichoice.co.za. It’s brimming with all the information you will need to become a filmmaker.

Entry forms for this year’s VUKA! Awards are available from http://vuka.multichoice.co.za or from most major industry suppliers and post-production facilities. Closing date for entries is October 30. Winners will be announced at a ceremony in November.




 A current news
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
letters to the editor
home page
archives A
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
a co-production by caroline smart services and .durbanet. site credits
copyright © subsists in this page. all rights reserved. [ edit ] copyright details  artsmart