A
 
Web www.artsmart.co.za
A R T S M A R T
arts news from kwazulu-natal

festivals
www.artsmart.co.za
enquiries@artsmart.co.za
 A current news
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
letters to the editor
home page
archives A
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
 

NB: as of 23 September 2008, all new artSMart articles are being published on the site news.artsmart.co.za.

NAF VISUAL ARTS PROGRAMME (article first published : 2004-04-6)

The milestone 2004 National Arts Festival opens in Grahamstown on July 1 with an extensive line-up of South African and international events capturing the spirit of the moment for a broad spectrum of audiences. The programme was introduced at a series of media briefings round the country this week and Festival Committee chair Mannie Manim was quoted saying "it is appropriate that the Festival’s 30th birthday should coincide with South Africa’s tenth year of democracy – a social miracle in which the arts played a central role".

A number of the main events from the Rhodes University Centenary celebrations have been timed to coincide with the 2004 National Arts Festival, making Grahamstown the place to be in the first week of July for everyone who is truly proudly South African.

Young Artist Award Winner Kathryn Smith’s Euphemism acknowledges the secret histories and unspoken desires that exist between private and public space, and flirts with the meeting of reality, fiction, fantasy and desire. The work is innately tied to the romantic notion of the art of murder.

The artist-in-residence programme gives festinos another chance to get up close and personal with artists. This year Gauteng-based sculptor Peter Schutz and textile artist Daina Mabunda from Durban will set up temporary studios.

Through the Looking Glass, curated by Brenda Schmahmann, features self-representations by women artists who go beyond the mirror’s reflection in a critical response to the traditional genre of self-portraiture.

A heroic act of printmaking, Paul Emmanuel’s site specific The Lost Men comprises 21 silk organza panels a metre wide and two metres long. The work will be installed on the Monument hill. Another challenging installation – Frances Goodman’s David – uses sound as its medium to reflect on the difference between the outer and inner worlds.

Initiation, part of growing up for many South Africans, is the subject of a thought-provoking multi-media event curated by Frank Ledimo of the Wits Art Galleries. Nguni cattle, central to South Africa’s indigenous culture, are celebrated in a monumental tapestry from the Keiskamma Art Project. The same size (70 m by 50 cm) as the Bayeux Tapestry, it shares a space with Leigh Voigt’s original oil paintings for The Nguni Herds, Marguerite Poland’s seminal book on these fabulous cattle.

Still on home ground, a dedicated show introduces the work of East Cape artists in many media. The Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Art Museum, Port Elizabeth, presents the work of studio potters from Madiba Bay. Individual potters will demonstrate.




 A current news
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
letters to the editor
home page
archives A
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
a co-production by caroline smart services and .durbanet. site credits
copyright © subsists in this page. all rights reserved. [ edit ] copyright details  artsmart