A
 
Web www.artsmart.co.za
A R T S M A R T
arts news from kwazulu-natal

festivals
www.artsmart.co.za
enquiries@artsmart.co.za
 A current news
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
letters to the editor
home page
archives A
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
 

NB: as of 23 September 2008, all new artSMart articles are being published on the site news.artsmart.co.za.

GRAHAMSTOWN, FRIDAY JUNE 30 (article first published : 2001-06-29)

Day Two of the Standard Bank National Arts Festival and I spoke too soon about the weather which was fine and sunny yesterday.

Today, it's cold, raining and windy and the press room is up at the 1820 Monument which is situated high on a hill overlooking Grahamstown. And I swear it catches every wind that blows from any direction - on a day like this you have to be brave to step out of the glass doors into the elements. But I'm not phased - I'm layered to the hilt (see yesterday's report!). It's a five-layer day today - vest, shirt, waistcoat, jersey and coat! A case of Not The Full Monty!

The weather has put a damper - literally as well as figuratively - on the outdoor activities of the Festival. The official craft side of the festival - The Village Green Craft Fair - is made up of three components - a "tent city" situated on Fiddler's Green; a Fast Forward Container Village for approximately 100 crafters sponsored by Transnet in Church Square, and an informal sector catering for daily traders.

The initiative was formed in 1989 when a small craft market was formalised and became an integral part of the festival. A group of Grahamstown Service Clubs undertook the project and formed the core shareholders. The three-part Fair is run by a voluntary committee comprising representatives from these service organisations.

I haven't been to the "tent city" (commonly known as Village Green) situated on Fiddler's Green yet but this is always a fascinating excursion. The series of marquees are filled with numerous stalls offering everything from jewellery, sculpture and ceramics to jerseys (sure to be doing well today!), candles (thousands of them!), clothing and woodwork.

The Container Village in the Church Square was a brilliant idea by Transnet. It's a ring of small PX's (about a quarter size of a small 20 ton container) which stallholders can re-pack with their wares and lock up at the end of the day. Those with awnings or tent roofs are braving the weather today and there are a surprising number of customers around.

Most of the pavement stallholders have awnings to cover their goods and are trying to continue trading as best they can but they take up a fair amount of the pavement space and street traffic is fairly crammed at the best of times. But when people are dressed in anoraks and coats and carrying umbrellas they take up more space than usual.

I'll be keeping in touch - Caroline Smart




 A current news
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
letters to the editor
home page
archives A
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
a co-production by caroline smart services and .durbanet. site credits
copyright © subsists in this page. all rights reserved. [ edit ] copyright details  artsmart