A
 
Web www.artsmart.co.za
A R T S M A R T
arts news from kwazulu-natal

drama
www.artsmart.co.za
enquiries@artsmart.co.za
 A current news
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
letters to the editor
home page
archives A
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
 

NB: as of 23 September 2008, all new artSMart articles are being published on the site news.artsmart.co.za.

TALES OF THE RISING SUN (article first published : 2001-04-12)

Tales of the Rising Sun is a fun treat for under-12s at Greyville's Kwasuka Theatre.

Pieter Scholtz's first children's show since Angelo's Magical Hat-Trick, seen at this Greyville theatre some three years ago, Tales of the Rising Sun is a sweet and entertaining holiday attraction showcasing two Japanese tales, both starring Scholtz and also adapted and directed by him.

Patrick Collyer, scene-stealing Sans Moonsamy and Philippa Savage feature alongside Scholtz in stories which, each running a half-hour-or-so and separated by a 15-minute interval, are aimed primarily at children aged seven to 11.

Presented against a backdrop of a large pink-white bloom on a wooden framework, the production opens with The Fisherman's Gift in which Moonsamy, last seen in this same theatre in Boxers and Bikinis and also a stand-out in the award-winning War Cry, plays the title character. He's the amusing Mr Urashimataro, who finds his kindness rewarded after accidentally netting, then setting free, a lugubrious turtle (Scholtz, wearing a colourful, shell-like backpack).

It isn't long before the appreciative, talking turtle leads the Japanese angler to the bottom of a lake where, to Mr Urashimataro's surprise, he can breathe. But another surprise awaits him in the form of a lake emperor that turns out to be a dragon, played by Scholtz with a wonderful, gigantic mask that, along with the set, has been imaginatively painted by Alan Keatinge. The dragon not only leads the audience in a chorus of Puff the Magic Dragon, the ending of which he alters to add more cheer, but also gives Mr Urashimataro a casket as a gift.

However, there is a condition: the fisherman must never open the casket. The young man, of course, eventually succumbs to temptation - with catastrophic results.

The second tale, The Great Timimoto, features a boy who is only a few centimetres tall. He's depicted as a puppet created by Greg King and manipulated and voiced by Philippa Savage. Narrated by Scholtz, the story has Timimoto sailing away in a basket to seek his fortune, using chopsticks as oars and his mother's knitting needle as a sword.

His adventures include a clash with a hungry frog (Collyer in another excellent giant mask by Keatinge) and also an angry ogre (Collyer again, in yet another large mask) who turns out to be quite a poet. Collyer also provides guitar accompaniment for ditties in both stories which, while they might benefit from more audience participation, make for a pleasant treat for little ones. A nice touch is Scholtz having created alternative endings for both stories.

Tales of the Rising Sun is being staged daily at 11h00 until April 17. However, note that performances are at 14h30 from Thursday to Sunday this week. Tickets R20 for children (R25 for adults). Book at Computicket or the theatre, the number for which is (031) 309-2236. Billy Suter




 A current news
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
letters to the editor
home page
archives A
crafts - dance - drama - film & tv - literature
music - supper theatre - visual arts
miscellaneous news - festivals
a co-production by caroline smart services and .durbanet. site credits
copyright © subsists in this page. all rights reserved. [ edit ] copyright details  artsmart